Samuel Whitethorne Block

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The house flies I had killed I felt worse over than the people I had hated. The sea urchins whose spines had stabbed my feet, I felt less anger towards than those who’d done me wrong. The zoo camel that spat its disgusting tasting spray into my face once in Central Park, I had forgiven more easily long ago than those who had in their own ignorance hurt me. I think the universe had itself exploded, and I was still playing with a loose sack of glass marbles spilling out somewhere I hadn’t seen, hadn’t imagined, could not believe. The smallness of it all, the dwarfed pettiness of human emotions and human motives—the misdirection, the misguidance, the maledictions that poured forth were, they all were in the end, no less amazing than anybody’s once believing in Peter Pan’s Neverland.

3 thoughts on “Samuel Whitethorne Block

  1. Yes, yes, but if it is so meaningless in size…why is it so ever-present and so troublesome? Is that when others might say–needs an attitude adjustment? But that too is just a flutter of fashion, is it not?

    Fun read. Full of inspiration. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

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